What is a thesis statement?

Every academic experience requires at one point a thesis or a research paper. The thesis is a scholarly written work based on a research problem pursued by the researcher.

What is a thesis statement?

According to , a thesis statement is a sentence or two that accurately captures the essence of the text at hand. It should not contain or attempt to contain the whole argument, but someone should be able to read your thesis and have a good sense of what is to come in the rest of the text. Think of your thesis as a promise you are making to your reader about what you are up to. That’s why so important that your thesis be accurate and straightforward, especially in academic writing. A vague or inexact thesis can be very damaging to your credibility as a writer.Get the best essay writing service from https://writing-service.essayseek.com/ company.

Essential components

Most good academic thesis statements contain two essential parts:

  1. The claim
  2. The support of the claim (the so-called “because clause”)

  1. The claim is where you take a stand and you state your main point as succinctly and powerfully as possible. One of the biggest mistakes that inexperienced writers often make with their thesis statement is hedging too much. They don’t come out and stand their position either because they are afraid of not sounding too “academic” or seeming too bold. So they throw in a lot of unnecessary language, such as excessive conditionals, that usually just ends up getting in the way of their actual argument.

An even more prevalent persona among beginning writers is the swashbuckling thesis writer. This is basically the opposite of the hedging writer: the usage of a lot of superlatives such as “best”, “worst”, etc. and lots of absolutes “never”, always”, “forever”, etc.

These two practices are deleterious in academic writing and must be avoided!

  1. The “because clause” is where you point to the support that you will rely upon to make the argument for your claim. It is also the place where you will define the terms of your claim. Here you want to answer the question “why my claim is valid?”.

Not every “because clause” has to contain the word “because”. You can simply reverse the order of the clauses in your thesis, thus emphasising the reason that supports the claim.